Walking the Barrow Way

Easy grade walking beside the River Barrow in South East Ireland
I have listed the entire Barrow Way walk but the southern stretch is more scenic. You can also pick a less strenuous section and ring your B&B to collect you at the end (check with them when booking). Of course you can drive to a particular place and just wander around if you are pushed for time, which is what most people do. Graiguenamanagh & St Mullins are favorite places to spend a few pleasant hours, take photos & get refreshments.

NOTE: See also the right hand menu for photos & info from each location along the river >

Tinnahinch, hikers, photo James Burke.

Full-on hikers at Tinnahinch, County Carlow. Easy grade walking means you don’t really need to hike but it’s also ideal for a spot of ‘wild camping’ ! – Photo: James Burke

113km (70 miles) in length, running beside the beautiful River Barrow, Ireland’s second longest river. By breaking the journey into several manageable strolls (or even at at different times) you can enjoy one of Europe’s most beautiful walks beside the beautiful River Barrow. Picnic or snacks & drinks advised as there may be nowhere to stock up between villages & towns.

The Walk – Stage 1 Starts in Lowtown for a distance of 14 miles (23km) which takes you to the town of Monasterevin. The raised banks of the canal offers beautiful views of the surrounding countryside with views of the Hill of Allen and the Wicklow Mountains.

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The River Barrow near Vicarstown, Co. Laois. Not great for boats but they say you can walk beside it.

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Athy. River Barrow from the bridge

 

Stage 2 Monasterevin to Athy – 14 miles (23km).
This stretch offers the visitor much of architectural interest with many old bridges and houses.

 

 

Stage 3 Athy to Carlow – 12 miles (19km).

Maganey Bridge, River Barrow, South East Ireland.

Maganey Bridge, River Barrow, South East Ireland.

This is the first of four stretches which pass through the county of Carlow. We start off from the heritage town of Athy (good Heritage Centre) and pass many interesting lifting bridges and old mills. Maganey bridge marks the junction of Three Counties: Kildare, Laois and Carlow. A very scenic stretch of the river but there’s more to come..

Gordon Bennett Rally, Fenniscourt Lock, River Barrow, Carlow, Ireland. Photo James Burke

Normally closed to motorised traffic, this vintage car rally passing through Fenniscourt was the exception. Walk beside the river Barrow to experience authentic Ireland off the tourist trails. Photo by James Burke


Recommended on the Barrow Way: | Walks & Destinations

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Stage 4 Carlow to Bagenalstown 10 miles (16km).

Milford, approximately 7 km south of Carlow town. Arguably, the most scenic stretch of the whole river begins here as you head South towards St Mullins..

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Otter feeding in the River Barrow. Photo James Burke

Set in an idyllic location with three bridges, large mill buildings and a large wooded area it is famous as an aquatic triangle. Otters, herons, dippers and kingfishers are often to be seen here. Walk up to the lock if you have time, along the (often muddy) tree-shaded navigation canal bank.

 

Read Irish Times article by Olivia O’Leary, (photo of Milford by me)

photo by James Burke

Milford, on the River Barrow. Photo by James Burke

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The Valerian Bridge in Leighlinbridge, with the Black Castle. Photo by James Burke

This stretch of our walk is rich with historical buildings and castles including the Black Castle at Leighlinbridge which was an important river crossing for centuries and said to be the oldest working bridge in Europe. There are several shops & pubs here. Cross the river and continue towards Bagenalstown via Rathellin Lock (shown below). Further downstream there are many architectural gems in the larger town of Bagenalstown.

walking the Barrow Way, bagenalstown, leighlinbridge, rathellin lock, photo by James Burke

The Barrow Way at Rathellin Lock, Bagenalstown.

Heritage Boat Association meet at the Quays, Bagenalstown. Photo: James Burke

Heritage Boat Association rally at the Quays, Bagenalstown. Photo: James Burke

Stage 5 Bagenalstown to Graignamanagh – 16 miles (26km).

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Dusk near Slyguff, Bagenalstown.

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Milestone –  St Mullins 17 miles. Photo James Burke. Look out for these lovely old granite milestones which pepper the riverbank and were installed when the river was made navigable for barges.

graiguenamanagh, tinnahinch, ireland, kayaking, photo james burke

Graiguenamanagh / Tinnahinch kayaking. Duiske Abbey in background. photo james burke

Graiguenamanagh bridge from Tinnahinch

Graiguenamanagh bridge from Tinnahinch

barrow way, lower tinnahinch lock, Graigenamanagh

Barrow Way, lower tinnahinch lock, Graigenamanagh

 

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Joyce’s – one of several great pubs in the picturesque Georgian village of Borris. Don’t forget the handbrake! The impressive viaduct at bottom of town once carried a railway and is the gateway to Mount Leinster.

Ballytiglea, River Barrow, County Carlow, Ireland

The river near Ballytiglea, near Bagenalstown

The village of Borris nestles in the foothills of the Blackstairs mountains and has retained its Georgian buildings and charms of former days. For Borris village you’ll need to walk up from Ballytiglea bridge. There is a petrol station / shop on the 1st left turn (towards Bagenalstown) where you can buy coffee & snacks or continue on towards Borris village.

Graiguenamanagh, County Kilkenny, photo by James Burke

Graiguenamanagh, County Kilkenny, photo by James Burke

 

Graiguenamanagh / Tinnahinch – a picturesque and friendly River Barrow boating centre with traditional pubs. As visited by Oz Clarke & James May in a BBC drinks programme.

 

 

St Mullins to Graignamanagh walk (heading North) – Irish Independent article link

Many Graiguenamanagh shops have kept their traditional fronts and the local public houses have earned nation-wide recognition for their friendly, old world atmosphere.

Jim Gill, leighlinbridge, river barrow bargeman

Jim Gill at the tiller in Leighlinbridge. The former River Barrow bargeman is from Graig’. Photo by James Burke

Our walk ends here in Graiguenamanagh, a picturesque abbey town. The name means ‘Grange of the Monks’ in Irish. The beautiful, restored medieval abbey is well worth a look inside. There are ancient high crosses in the graveyard.

Stage 6 Graiguenamanagh to St. Mullins – 4 miles (6km).

St. Mullins

Frosty morning at St Mullins

Frosty morning at St Mullins

This lovely riverside stretch has beautiful woodland surroundings with a strong ecclesiastical theme in the religious settlement at St. Mullins. The St Mullins complex includes a medieval church ruin, the base of a round tower and the former Church of Ireland church, built in 1811, which now hosts a heritage centre (often closed). Many 1798 United Irishmen men are buried here and the area has been a place of pilgrimage for centuries, especially during the Plague. Walk back along the riverside to find St Mullins Lock.

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A Norman Motte (fortified hill tower) dominates the approach to the village of St Mullins. The Bailey (village) can still be seen in the uneven grass at it’s feet.

St Mullins & Mount Brandon

St Mullins & Mount Brandon

A handy pub is located nearby on the village green and a new Cafe is situated by the river (open in high season, CLOSED MONDAYS). The lower stretch of St Mullins is set on a glorious stretch of the Barrow Valley and includes a picnic area and restaurant. The tide reaches St Mullins from New Ross so there is a sea lock nearby and this marks the end of the riverside walking.

Off season visits: The so-called ‘shoulder months’ are great for visiting the Barrow Valley. May gives you beautiful wild flowers and trees in first flush of green while October has early mists, autumnal shades, peace & quiet. As a bonus, off-season accommodation prices fall too.

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The Barrow Way on a foggy morning

 

Saint Mullins, County Carlow, River Barrow

Saint Mullins, County Carlow, River Barrow

St Mullins graveyard, County Carlow, Ireland

St Mullins graveyard, County Carlow, Ireland

Video:

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http://vimeo.com/76456572 – barge at Clashganny. HD Video


USEFUL LINKS FOR BARROW WAY WALKERS:

Barrow Valley Facebook Page – share your feedback (no adverts tolerated)

Click here for Irish Trails – PDF maps of walk stages

Walk Ballytiglea (Borris) to St Mullins by the riverside – Irish Times

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See also South Leinster Way

 

 

 

 

 

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Buy a map here from local company East West Mapping. This excellent map contains many locally-researched place names not found on official OSI maps (which also lack many of the numerous ancient structures).

 

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About barrowvalley.net

This website features the photography & writing of James Burke, who lives locally and has been enchanted by the River Barrow since arriving. All images & videos are copyright James Burke.

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